Click here to search for Mopar cars and parts for sale.


Moparchat - Home of MOPAR enthusiasts worldwide!  

Go Back   Moparchat - Home of MOPAR enthusiasts worldwide! > Technical Forums > Performance Talk
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read


Welcome to the Moparchat - Home of MOPAR enthusiasts worldwide! forums.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-28-2010, 10:21 PM
pishta's Avatar
pishta pishta is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Tustin, CA
Age: 46
Posts: 3,986
Default DIY cam bearing install

Was trying to figure out how to do this at home because of the PITA getting a block to the machine shop by myself. Anyway, after trying to use a home made bolt draw-in style installer for the rear #5 bearing that didnt work, I had an ah-HA moment. Why not use a old camshaft to press the rear bearing in? Slip the bearing over the cam, thread in the cam so the other bearings are supporting it and use the gear on the SB cam as the drive. Tap it in with a 3 lb mallet. Worked perfect! All you need to remember is that the hole in the bearing MUST match the hole in the block. Put a bolt in the cam or hit with a brass mallet to prevent damage to the snout of the cam, but I had an old junker to use. Same principle with the correct tool (which I can actually borrow for the other 4 bearings from a mechanic I know). So if you ever have to replace the #5 bearing on a Sunday night here's how ! I think you can do the same with the front by using the timing chain cog. Put bearing on cam, install cog and thread cam into block. The cam will keep the bearing straight and the cog will push the bearing flush into the block by driving the cam in by mallet. Slip the old bearing on the same cam and start all over to countersink the new bearing. The trick is to use the cam bearing race as the guide to keep the bearing square. If the hole doesn't line up, you can use a long drill bit through the #1 main to redrill the oil hole, Ghetto Garage 101!
__________________
'65 Cuda "S" 451--now 402
'97 Plymouth Breeze
'93 Lexus LS400 R.I.P.
'03 T&C MommyVan

Last edited by pishta : 03-28-2010 at 11:57 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-03-2010, 11:57 PM
pishta's Avatar
pishta pishta is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Tustin, CA
Age: 46
Posts: 3,986
Default

Post Mortom: After installing all 5 bearings successfully with of all things a 2" expansion plug (!) 3/4 fender washer, a 1 inch socket on a 18" extension and a 3 lb sledge, my #2 bearing is binding on my cam. so much so that when I installed the cam, it actually pushed the bearing out of the #2 bore! So I backed up, removed the bearing and tried to slip it on the #2 journal on the cam. It goes almost exactly 3/4 way on and them binds. I have gone around the entire babbit with a knife and I cant seem to make it fit on the dang #2 journal. I know its the correct one as all the others are fine. Im about to run a sandpaper flapper wheel through it to open it up a bit but thought I would ask: Can I purchase a single cam bearing anywhere, specifically a 360 #2 bearing?
__________________
'65 Cuda "S" 451--now 402
'97 Plymouth Breeze
'93 Lexus LS400 R.I.P.
'03 T&C MommyVan
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-05-2010, 12:36 AM
pishta's Avatar
pishta pishta is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Tustin, CA
Age: 46
Posts: 3,986
Default

Closure: #2 is in and cam spins freely. Seems the bearing shell got tweaked when I installed it. After I pushed it out with the cam and found it not even fitting around the journal, I took a dead blow hammer and forced the bearing onto the journal as far as it would go by hand and commenced to tapping it around the entire circumference in an attempt to reform it back to its perfect circle. Well, seems it worked as it now can pass over the entire journal with just a slight drag. I hit the babbit with a scotchbright and it looks as good as new. So in hindsight, I would deffinately recommend attempting this at home using the following procedure:

1. Go to Home Depot and get the thickest 3/4 fender washer (shiny ones) you can find. They seem to vary in thickness.
2. Go to your favorite GOOD parts house and pick up a 2" expansion plug (for freeze plug repairs, has a neoprene puck on the backside and a nut to expand it, mine was gold and made in India, 6 bucks)
3. Get another fender washer that just fits under the nut on the expansion plug.
4. optional but recommended if you have a welder: a large nut that will fit your largest socket that is under 1 3/4 inches in OD. Tack weld this to the fender washer in #3 as close to centered as possible

Step 1) Remove rear cam freeze plug and tap out bearing shell with a punch. Pretty EZ once you find the edge of the bearing. Tap out from 3 places around the bearing to keep from cocking in the bore. Continue with the #4 bearing from the rear with a longer punch or piece of heavy allthread. Get the rest out from the front in whatever manner works. I didnt even put a mark on the cast iron bearing bores, they seem pretty tough.

Step 2) Put #1 bearing on neoprene puck of expansion plug. you might have to reduce the diameter of the puck on a grinder or sandpaper. It should slip on by hand. Tighten the expansion nut. Draw a line on the back of the expansion plug to note where the oil feed hole is. You should now have your installer. Put the large 1/2 drive socket you have over the large nut you tack welded on the fender washer and use a 6" 1/2" drive extension as a handle for your drive. Line up the oil hole indicator with the oil hole by looking on the back of the plug through the bore and noting the oil hole in the block. Keeping the handle straight, tap the #1 bearing into the bore with a hammer just like you would with the "$155 Universal cam bearing installer tool" until the expansion plug bottoms in the bore. loosen expansion nut and remove plug, Check alignment with wire through main bearing oil hole. Done with #1.

Step 3) Continue with this process for the 2, 3 and 4 using longer extensions or by connecting them. The trick here is to use the 3/4 fender washer as the centering guide off the #1 bearing just like the plastic cone on the expensive tool. Tape the fender washer across the #1 bore (itll pop out every time you smack the drive if you dont), itll almost countersink into the bearing. Now thread your extension through this "jig" and install loaded puck and socket from within the block. This works perfect!

Step 4) The #5 bearing is the easiest. Just install on end of cam and tap cam 1/4" past home with a wood block over nose. Monitor other bearings while you do this and stop if you see any pressing through. Make sure all oil holes line up with wire probe one more time. Cam should rotate by hand and not bind. If it does remove and look for shiny spots on babbit, clearance with bearing scraper or pocket knife. Scuffs/scratches heal easily with scotchbrite pads. Done deal and you never had to load the greasy 200lb bare block into your trunk or worse, Wife and kids spotless Minivan! This has been the Sunday night mechanic...Case closed...
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-05-2010, 12:00 PM
dodger1 dodger1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Princeton BC
Age: 76
Posts: 2,648
Default

Thanks, pishta. How about a pix or 2 of the tool? You know, the "1000 word" kind.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-05-2010, 05:00 PM
pishta's Avatar
pishta pishta is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Tustin, CA
Age: 46
Posts: 3,986
Default

Here are some photos: Forgot I used another 3/4 fender on back as support and nut/socket is a 15/16, fits right on 1/2 expansion nut:


__________________
'65 Cuda "S" 451--now 402
'97 Plymouth Breeze
'93 Lexus LS400 R.I.P.
'03 T&C MommyVan
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-05-2010, 06:35 PM
John Kunkel John Kunkel is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: NorCal
Age: 70
Posts: 9,919
Default

One of the simplest tools for reaming cam bearings is an old cam with a diagonal hacksaw slit in each bearing journal. The slits act as a reamer when the shaft is slowly turned while inserting it.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Cambrgream.jpg (65.6 KB, 29 views)
__________________
They say money can't buy happiness but it can sure finance the illusion.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-05-2010, 08:02 PM
pishta's Avatar
pishta pishta is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Tustin, CA
Age: 46
Posts: 3,986
Default

Now he tells me...Good one, John!
__________________
'65 Cuda "S" 451--now 402
'97 Plymouth Breeze
'93 Lexus LS400 R.I.P.
'03 T&C MommyVan
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Want to contribute to Moparchat?  Click below!




120x60_green

rollback0306_120X90.gif




New 2006



468 x 60 with phones
2GB Totally Free Online Backup!  Compliments of Mozy!


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

www.pchelp.com

Forums Directory